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Main  ::  Translations - all  ::  Carmen 7  ::  Basiationes, made up word (Carmen 7)Subscribe  •  Add new message

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AuthorMessage
Guest
Posted on Sun Jan 21, 2007 17:28:33  Quote
I am taking Latin currently and right now we are studying Catullus and Clodia (aka Lesbia). My latin teacher told us that basiationes was a made up word meaning kissifications and you put it as a different translation. Just pointing it out for the people who run the website.
Chris Weimer
Posted at Mon Jan 22, 2007 01:12:57  Quote
You teacher is exaggerating. Basio, -are means to kiss. Basiatus means having been kissed, and the -io ending basiatio, indicates the act of kissing. However, in English, a "kiss" can be either the physical kiss, or the act of kissing itself. There's no distinction. And there's no reason to make up a nonsensical english word (basiatio is definitely plausible, and not seen as odd, while kissification is nonsensicale) when there's already an English word which gets the point across.

Chris
Stine
Posted at Mon Jan 22, 2007 08:40:01  Quote
Chris, if this was not your post, please let me know, and I will change it back to a guest post

-Stine
Den Sødeste
Chris Weimer
Posted at Tue Jan 23, 2007 10:09:36  Quote
Quote:
  Chris, if this was not your post, please let me know, and I will change it back to a guest post

Huh?
Stine
Posted at Tue Jan 23, 2007 10:57:18  Quote
Quote:
  Huh?

The reply above was posted by "Guest" - but as it looked like a post made by you I thought that you had just forgotten to log in and I changed the user from "Guest" to "Chris Weimer"! But maybe you had nothing to do with that post?! Gosh, it is getting complicated
Den Sødeste
Chris Weimer
Posted at Wed Jan 24, 2007 04:01:41  Quote
Quote:
  The reply above was posted by "Guest" - but as it looked like a post made by you I thought that you had just forgotten to log in and I changed the user from "Guest" to "Chris Weimer"! But maybe you had nothing to do with that post?! Gosh, it is getting complicated

It should have went Guest, Chris Weimer, Stine, Chris Weimer, Stine, Chris Weimer.
Stine
Posted at Wed Jan 24, 2007 08:42:27  Quote
- And now Stine! My point exactly! Case closed
Den Sødeste
KJCLbabe
Posted at Mon Apr 30, 2007 02:39:52  Quote
I disagree. Basia is the latin word for kiss. "Basiatio" is used nowhere else but here. So, kissifications is... at least semiplausible. But it is not simply "kiss" it implys something more... or Catullus might have just used this created word to fit the meter.

me
Vivamus atque Amemus.
Guest
Posted at Wed Feb 13, 2008 04:45:05  Quote
a basiatio is basically like a make-out "session"
shikisha
Posted at Thu Mar 20, 2008 12:13:27  Quote
Basiatio is obviously cheeky, a fun word; he wasn't bothered by dictionaries and wanted to make her laugh as we might a say 'a kissathon' which is not to be found in Webster or the OED. In fact it's not the only occurrence - Martial used it twice.

I'm working on a version to match the original scansion and have come up with this:

If you ask me to say how many bouts of
Kissing, Lesbia, would satisfy, and more, my passion...
Guest
Posted at Tue Jun 17, 2008 21:16:14  Quote
If you want it to fit the scansion, you should probably have 11 syllables in each line (your second line there runs a bit long). I've just completed a properly metered English translation of Carmina 7 myself. Good stuff.

-- Cheers, Jim
Cambrinus
Posted at Sun Jan 10, 2010 17:33:57  Quote
Quote:
  a basiatio is basically like a make-out "session"


This is the only contribution near the mark; find a good dictionary, people, then look up both basium and osculum, then osculatio. Now, ask yourself what basiatio might conceivably mean.
Guest
Posted at Mon Aug 09, 2010 13:05:37  Quote
'kissification' is not a word that really exists, but then, technically neither does 'basiationes'. It's pretty difficult to find a word that translates exactly from any latin word, let alone a made up one. So if 'kissifications' gets the meaning across, then why not use it? It may not appeal to the latin purists, but if i was Lesbia, it would amuse me, and presumably that is Catullus' intent. That's just my view on the matter. Perhaps 'make-out session' is more accurate, but it doesn't sound nearly as cute. Catullus is writing this poem to a lover, not to a grammarian.
 


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