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Main  ::  Translations - all  ::  Carmen 46  ::  Catullus 46: I don't understand this poem (Carmen 46)Subscribe  •  Add new message

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AuthorMessage
Guest
Posted on Mon Oct 16, 2006 12:03:36  Quote
I DONT UNDERSTAND THIS POEM!!!!!!!!!!!! It makes no sense...what feeling does it evoke except for confusion!!!
Guest
Posted at Tue Feb 13, 2007 05:24:43  Quote
It's definately sexual, but that's about all I can gather.
Guest
Posted at Tue Feb 20, 2007 18:39:43  Quote
This poem was written after Catullus finished his tour of duty in Bithynia. The poem is about spring restlessness soon to be satisfied by travel. Broadly it talks about the pleasures of anticipation. (Garrison, The Student's Catullus, 2004, pg. 119).
Guest
Posted at Thu Mar 22, 2007 22:08:32  Quote
Just read it out scanned in Latin - the rhythm of the meter totally carries you away - I don't know what's so complicated about feeling restless in the springtime, he wants to travel and see the Asian cities, and he says that the friends met together in Bythinia will all travel home by different routes.
Guest
Posted at Thu Apr 26, 2007 04:53:56  Quote
It was often very dangerous to stay in Rome (or in Italy, for that matter) in the summertime. Rome was a swamp- and the mosquitos inhabited it during the hot and humid months, spreading malaria and other diseases. Catullus, like others of the higher class, had a summer house in Asia, to which he loved going. This poem reveals his anticipation to travel the familiar roads to reach his beloved summer home in Bithynia.
-MC
Cambrinus
Posted at Sun Jan 10, 2010 20:22:10  Quote
MC's message is nonsense and can be ignored. You really need to know that Catullus has been waiting for spring, which will allow him to return home by yacht (see poem 4) after his year in Bithynia. How about:

Now spring returns balmy warmth, now
The anger of the March sky tails off
In pleasant breezes from the West.
You should leave the plains of Phrygia,
Catullus, and the rich soil of sultry Nicaea.
Now your jittery mind longs to be off, now
Your happy feet tap in anticipation.
Sweet gang of comrades, goodbye;
You who set out with me, and whom
Different paths will variously take home.
Guest
Posted at Thu May 12, 2011 11:56:37  Quote
the message from MC is indeed totally false
 


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